PLENARY SPEAKERS

Dorota Gryko

Dorota Gryko

Coming soon

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Andreas Herrmann

Andreas Herrmann

RWTH Aachen University, Germany

Andreas Herrmann studied chemistry at the University of Mainz (Germany). From 1997 to 2000 he pursued his graduate studies at the Max-Planck-Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz. Then he worked as a consultant for Roland Berger Management Consultants in Munich (2001). In the years 2002 and 2003 he returned to academia working on protein engineering at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich. In 2004 he was appointed as a head of a junior research group at the Max-Planck-Institute for Polymer Research. In 2007 he moved to the Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials at the University of Groningen, The Netherlands, where he held a chair for Polymer Chemistry and Bioengineering. Since 2017 Prof. Herrmann is scientific board member of the DWI Leibniz-Institute for Interactive Materials, Aachen, Germany and Professor of Macromolecular Chemistry and Systems at RWTH Aachen University.
The Herrmann group investigates engineered biomacromolecuels and bioorganic hybrid materials for biomedical and technological applications. Prof. Herrmann was awarded the Reimund-Stadler-Prize from the German Chemical Society (GDCh) in 2008 and the Dr. Hermann-Schnell-Prize (GDCh) in 2009. For work on nucleic acid hybrid materials he received an ERC Starting Grant from the European Commission (2009) and a VICI Grant from the NWO (2010). In fall 2012 a team around Prof. Herrmann won the Dutch Venture Challenge organized by the Netherlands Genomics Initiative (NGI) and in 2013 he was awarded the Eyenovative prize from Novartis. In 2016, he received an ERC Advanced Grant from the European Commission.

Speech Title: Activation of drugs, proteins and genes by ultrasound

 

Cynthia J. Burrows

Cynthia J. Burrows

University of Utah, United States

Cynthia Burrows is the Thatcher Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. Her studies in organic chemistry at University of Colorado, Cornell University and Université Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg, led eventually to her present interests in the chemistry and biochemistry of modified bases in DNA and RNA with a focus on oxidative stress. This work led to the discovery of an epigenetic role for oxidized DNA bases in G-quadruplex motifs along with new single-molecule methods for understanding nucleic acid folding, the impact of base modifications, and sequencing. Burrows is the recipient of several ACS awards and was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2009 and to the National Academy of Sciences in 2014. She also serves as Editor-in-Chief of Accounts of Chemical Research.

Speech Title: Protein Nanopores Reveal Single-Molecule Behavior of DNA & RNA

 

Rachel K. O'Reilly

Rachel K. O'Reilly

University of Birmingham, United Kingdom

Rachel O’Reilly is currently a Professor of Chemistry and Head of School at the University of Birmingham. She got her first degree from the University of Cambridge and went on to complete her PhD at Imperial College, London in 2003 with Professor Vernon Gibson. She then moved to the US to under the joint direction of Professors Craig J. Hawker and Karen L. Wooley. In 2006 she took up a Royal Society Fellowship at the University of Cambridge and then in 2009 she moved to the University of Warwick and in 2012 was promoted to full professor. She moved to Birmingham in 2018. Her group undertakes research in the area of catalysis, responsive polymers, nanostructure characterization and DNA nanomaterials. She has published over 200 papers to date and has received a number of awards, including the IUPAC-Samsung young polymer scientist award in 2012, and in 2013 the American Chemical Society Mark Young Polymer Scientist award. In 2017 she was awarded the Macromolecules/Biomacromolecules young investigator award from the ACS in recognition of her innovative research in polymer science and in 2020 the RSC Corday-Morgan Prize. She is on the reviewing board of editors for Science, on the editorial advisory board of JACS and an associate editor for Macromolecules.

Speech Title: Precision polymer nanoparticles

 

Jørgen Kjems

Jørgen Kjems

Aarhus University, Denmark

Coming soon

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Stefan Matile

Stefan Matile

University of Geneva, Switzerland

Stefan Matile is a Full Professor in the Department of Organic Chemistry at the University of Geneva and a founding member of the National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR) Chemical Biology and the NCCR Molecular Systems Engineering. In 2010, he became an ERC Advanced Investigator. Educated at the University of Zurich (PhD, with Wolf Woggon) and Columbia University in New York (postdoc, with Koji Nakanishi), he started his independent academic career as an Assistant Professor at Georgetown University, Washington DC, before moving to Geneva. He likes supramolecular systems in action, at work. He is particularly passionate about the integration of unorthodox interactions into functional systems, hoping that new ways to get in touch would provide access to structures and functions that are needed to ultimately tackle otherwise intractable challenges. Current functions of interest cover systems catalysis with anion-π interactions, chalcogen and pnictogen bonds, extreme sulfur chemistry to find new ways to enter into cells (and hinder viruses to do the same), and mechanochemical fluorescent probes that change color like lobsters during cooking to image physical forces in biology.

Speech Title: Translational Supramolecular Chemistry

 

Ling Peng

Ling Peng

Aix-Marseille University, France

Dr. Ling Peng is a research director at the French National Scientific Research Center (CNRS) and a group leader in the Interdisciplinary Center on Nanoscience in Marseille (CINaM) at Aix-Marseille University in France. She has been working actively at the interface of chemistry and biology, and in particular, developing functional dendrimers for biomedical applications, molecular probes for exploring biological events and triazole nucleoside derivatives for drug discovery. She has pioneered bio-inspired structurally flexible dendrimers and self-assembling supramolecular dendrimers for biomedical applications such as drug delivery, gene therapy and bioimaging. One of these dendrimers has been scheduled for clinical study. Dr. Ling PENG has co-authored more than 100 scientific papers, 8 patents and 14 book chapters. She was awarded with the Prize of Dr & Mme Henri Labbé of the French Academy of Sciences in 2017 and granted as distinguished member of the French Chemical Society in 2020. Her research team was labelled by La Ligue Contre le Cancer in France.

Speech Title: Self-assembling supramolecular dendrimers for biomedical applications

 

Dipankar Sen

Dipankar Sen

Simon Fraser University, Canada

Dipankar Sen graduated obtained his Ph.D. in Chemistry at Yale University, with Donald M. Crothers., followed by postdoctoral work in Cellular and Developmental Biology at Harvard University with Walter Gilbert. He has been on the faculty at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia, Canada, since 1991 and is currently Professor of Chemistry and also Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry. His research interests focus on the fundamental chemical and physical properties of DNA and RNA, nucleic acid catalysis, biosensors, and G-quadruplexes.

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Peter Strazewski

Peter Strazewski

Université de Lyon, France

Peter “Pierre” Strazewski is full professor in the Institut de Chimie et Biochimie Moléculaires et Supramoléculaires at the Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 and team leader of CO2Glyco. He got his PhD degree in Organic Chemistry at the University of Basel in 1986. After a time as research assistant in the group of his PhD supervisor Prof. Christoph Tamm, he spent his post-doctoral studies with Dr. Olga Kennard, Director of the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre and PI in the Chemistry Department of the University Cambridge, UK, where he studied the crystallisation and structure of mispaired synthetic DNA and RNA. Back in the Chemistry Department in Basel, he started in 1990 his independent research focusing on the mispairing thermodynamics of RNA and on puromycin as the key junction for synthetic amphiphilic peptidyl-RNA conjugates. After moving to Lyon in 2001, he extended his research with microscopic observations of phospholipidic vesicles as evolvable compartments for membranophilic peptide-RNA conjugates. He is a founding member of the European Systems Chemistry community, author of several book chapters and focuses now on self-evolvable compartmentalised chemical systems for the understanding of the emergence of RNA-mediated peptide synthesis in lipid vesicles and, ultimately, the origin of translation in synthetic cells.

Speech Title: Coming soon