PLENARY SPEAKERS

S3IC 2020 conference will gather high-profile Sensors, Single-Molecules and Nanosystems experts to deliver plenary speeches:

Prof. Carlos Bustamante

Prof. Carlos Bustamante

Berkley University, United States

 

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Prof. Cees Dekker

Prof. Cees Dekker

Delft University of Technology, Netherlands

Prof. dr. Cees Dekker (1959) is Distinguished University Professor at Delft University of Technology and KNAW Royal Academy Professor. Trained as a solid-state physicist, he discovered many of the exciting electronic properties of carbon nanotubes in the 1990s. Since 2000 he moved to single-molecule biophysics and nanobiology, with research from studies of DNA loop extrusion and supercoiling to DNA translocation through nanopores. More recently his research has focused on studying chromatin structure and cell division with bacteria on chip, while he is also attempting to ultimately build synthetic cells from the bottom up.

Dekker is an elected member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences and fellow to the APS and the IOP. Dekker headed the prestigious Kavli Institute of Nanoscience Delft as Director from 2010-2018. He initiated an entirely new Department of Bionanoscience at Delft and leads the 51M€ NWO Zwaartekracht program NanoFront. He published over 300 papers, received an honorary doctorate, and many prizes such as the 2001 Agilent Europhysics Prize, the 2003 Spinoza award, the 2012 ISNSCE Nanoscience Prize, and the 2017 NanoSmat Prize. In 2006, Delft University appointed him as an Institute Professor. In 2014, Dekker was knighted as Knight in the Order of the Netherlands Lion, and in 2015, he received his second ERC Advanced Grant and the KNAW appointed him as a Royal Academy Professor.

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Prof. Hermann Gaub

Prof. Hermann Gaub

Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany

Hermann Gaub studied physics in Ulm and Munich and completed his PhD in 1984 at the TU Munich with the investigation of scaling concepts in two-dimensional polymers. He then went to Stanford and explored antigen presentation in the immunological synapse. Back in Munich as an associate professor, he pioneered the use of atomic force microscopy for the study of mechanical properties of single molecules. His investigations have had a significant impact on our view of the role of mechanical forces in biology. His lab was the first to measure the interaction forces between individual ligand-receptor systems and to provide a detailed view of their binding potentials and unbinding forces. Having taken over the chair for Applied Physics at the Ludwig-Maximilians University in 1995, he invented single molecule force spectroscopy techniques and applied them to the study of biopolymers. His group was the first to explore the unique mechanical properties of single proteins. In addition to these fundamental developments, his lab used the single molecule AFM approach to engineer the first man-made single molecule motor and to pioneer single molecule cut-and-paste technology. Hermann Gaub is co-founder and director of several institutions amongst them the Center for NanoScience Munich. He has received multiple honors such as the Max Planck Award of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and the Langmuir Lecture Award of the American Chemical Society. He holds an adjunct professorship at the Jilin University and is a member of several institutions and academies including the German National Academy.

Speech Title: Molecular mechanisms of extreme mechanostability in protein complexes

 

Prof. Harald Giessen

Prof. Harald Giessen

University of Stuttgart, Germany

 

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Prof. Luke Lee

Prof. Luke Lee

Berkley University, United States

 

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Prof. David Leigh

Prof. David Leigh

The University of Manchester, UK

 

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Prof. William E. Moerner  - Remote Talk

Prof. William E. Moerner - Remote Talk

Stanford University, United States

Education:
• 1982: PhD (Physics), Cornell University
Positions:
o 1981-95: Research Staff Member, IBM Almaden Research Center, San Jose, CA.
o 1993-1994: Guest Professor of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zürich
o 1995-98: Distinguished Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California,
San Diego
o 1998-: Professor, Chemistry; Courtesy Professor, Applied Physics, Stanford University.
Selected Awards:
• 2007, Member of the National Academy of Sciences
• 2008, Wolf Prize in Chemistry
• 2009, Irving Langmuir Prize in Chemical Physics
• 2013, Peter Debye Award in Physical Chemistry
• 2014, Nobel Prize in Chemistry for super-resolved fluorescence microscopy
Research Interests:
• Physical chemistry, biophysics, and the optical properties of single molecules
• Active development of 2D and 3D super-resolution optics and imaging for cell biology
• Imaging studies include protein superstructures in bacteria, structure of proteins in cells,
studies of chromatin organization, and dynamics of regulatory proteins in the primary cilium.
• Measurements of the motions of single proteins, DNA, and RNA in 3D in real time
• Precise analysis of photodynamics of single trapped biomolecules in solution, with
applications to photosynthesis, protein-protein interactions, and transport measurements

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Prof. Martin Plenio

Prof. Martin Plenio

Ulm University, Germany

Martin B Plenio is Director of the Institute of Theoretical Physics at Ulm University and founding Director of the newly established Center of Quantum BioSciences. He received his Diploma (1992) and PhD (1994) at Göttingen University. Following his Fedor-Lynen Fellow in the group of Prof. Sir Peter Knight at Imperial College London he received his first faculty appointment at Imperial College in 1998 and eventually rose to Full Professor there in 2003. In 2009 he took up an Alexander von Humboldt Professorship to move to Ulm University. His work covers a broad range of topics, including quantum information science, quantum effects in biological systems, quantum optics, and quantum technologies for quantum simulation and quantum sensing. Recent recognitions of his work include an ERC Synergy grant, international research prizes, the award of Research Building & Center for Quantum-BioSciences and his listing as a Highly Cited Researcher. He is co-founder of NVision Imaging Technologies whose technology builds on his research.

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Prof. Claudia Veigel

Prof. Claudia Veigel

LMU Munich, Germany

 

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Prof. Viola Vogel

Prof. Viola Vogel

ETH Zürich, Switzerland

 

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Prof. Jörg Wrachtrup

Prof. Jörg Wrachtrup

University of Stuttgart, Germany

Coming soon

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Prof. Xiaoliang Sunney Xie

Prof. Xiaoliang Sunney Xie

Peking University, China

 

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

INVITED SPEAKERS

S3IC 2020 conference will bring together researchers in the rapidly advancing field of Single Molecule Sensors and Nanosystems to give invited talks:

Prof. Ara Apkarian

Prof. Ara Apkarian

University of California Irvine, United States

 

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Prof. David Bensimon

Prof. David Bensimon

ENS, France

David Bensimon is Director of Research at CNRS. He graduated summa cum laude in Physics and Electrical Engineer from Technion (1976). He went on to do a M.Sc. in Applied Physics at the Weizmann Institute and a Ph.D. in Theoretical Physics (1986), on Chaos and pattern formation at the University of Chicago under the direction of Leo Kadanoff. Following a post-doc at Bell labs, he joined the Laboratoire de Physique Statistique at the ENS where he co-leads a research team with V.Croquette. After initial investigations of the shape of  phospholipid vesicles of non-spherical topology, he co-discovered molecular combing and studied the elastic properties of a single DNA molecule and its interactions with proteins using the magnetic trap system developed in his group. He recently extended his interest to the photo-control of protein activity in a live organism and to problems in evolution.  A holder of 20 patents, founder of two companies, he is also Professor at UCLA where he spends the winter quarters.

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Prof. Maria Garcia-Parajo

Prof. Maria Garcia-Parajo

ICFO – the Institute of Photonic Sciences

 

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Prof. Amit Meller

Prof. Amit Meller

Technion, Israel

 

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Prof. Felix Ritort

Prof. Felix Ritort

Universitat de Barcelona, Spain

Dr. Felix Ritort carried out his PhD during the years 1989-1991 in theoretical physics in the area of statistical physics. During the years 1992-2002 he made several contributions to the field of disordered systems and nonequilibrium physics. Since 2002 he worked in single-molecule biophysics by manipulating individual nucleic acids and proteins to investigate energy processes in the molecular world. Ritort’s group is recognized worldwide as a leader in applying the finest and most powerful methods to extract accurate quantitative information about thermodynamics and kinetics of molecular interactions. Dr. Ritort has been awarded several prizes for his research: the Distinció de la Generalitat de Catalunya in 2001 for his theoretical research during the years 1991-2000; ICREA Academia Award 2008, 2013 and 2018 for his research as scholar at the University of Barcelona; Bruker Prize in 2013 from the Sociedad de Biofísica de España for his contributions to molecular biophysics research in Spain. He is also chair of the Division of Physics for Life Sciences of the European Physical Society.

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Prof. Ozgur Sahin

Prof. Ozgur Sahin

Colombia University, United States

 

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Prof. Erik Schäffer

Prof. Erik Schäffer

University of Tübingen, Germany

Dr. Erik Schäffer is a full professor of Cellular Nanoscience at the University of Tübingen, Germany since 2012.  He studied physics at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, and at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA, where he received his M.S. degree in 1997.  His doctoral studies were in polymer physics and chemistry at the University of Konstanz, Germany, and the University of Groningen, The Netherlands (1998-2001).  He switched to biology for his postdoctoral research at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany (2002-2006).  There he built his first optical tweezers to study molecular motors.  In 2007, he received an Emmy Noether award to establish an independent research group at the Technical University Dresden.  In 2010, he was awarded with an ERC Starting Grant and, in 2016, with a prize for bold science from the State of Baden-Württemberg, Germany.  Currently, his research in biophysics focuses on developing and applying single-molecule fluorescence and force microscopy techniques – high-resolution optical tweezers and novel trapping probes – to understand how molecular machines, such as kinesin transport motors and DNA repair proteins, work mechanically to fulfill their cellular function. 

Speech Title: Germanium nanospheres as high precision optical tweezers probes

 

Prof. Latha Venkataraman

Prof. Latha Venkataraman

Columbia University, United States

 

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Prof. Shimon Weiss

Prof. Shimon Weiss

University of California, Los Angeles, United States

Shimon Weiss received his PhD from the Technion in Electrical Engineering in 1989. After a one year post doctorate at AT&T Bell Laboratories, where he worked on ultrafast phenomena in semiconducting devices, he joined Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as a staff scientist in 1990, where he continued to work on solid state spectroscopy. In 1994 he re-directed his interest to single molecule biophysics. In 2001 he joined the UCLA Chemistry & Biochemistry and the Physiology departments. In 2016 he also joined the Physics department at Bar Ilan University, Israel (part time).

The Weiss lab has been working on ultrasensitive single molecule spectroscopy methods for over two decades. They were the first to introduce the single molecule FRET method and together with the Alivisatos group the first to introduced quantum dots to biological imaging. They have also developed a variety of single molecule spectroscopy methods, a variety of  novel detectors for advanced imaging and spectroscopy, a superresolution imaging method dubbed SOFI, and novel optical imaging tools for single cell physiology. Currently they are developing single inorganic nanoparticle voltage sensors for probing neural networks.

Dr. Weiss has published 180 peer-reviewed papers, and holds 32 issued and 35 published patents. He was awarded the Humboldt Research Award, the Rank Prize in opto-electronics, and the Michael and Kate Barany Biophysical Society Award. He holds the Dean Willard Chair in Chemistry and Biochemistry and he is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America.

Speech Title: Advances in inorganic voltage nanosensors

 

Prof. Peter Zijlstra

Prof. Peter Zijlstra

Eindhoven University Of Technology

Peter Zijlstra obtained his MSc degree in Applied Physics at the University of Twente in The Netherlands. In 2009, he received his PhD from Swinburne University of Technology (Melbourne, Australia), where he studied the photothermal properties of single plasmonic nanoparticles with applications in multidimensional optical storage. After a postdoctoral fellowship at Leiden University (The Netherlands) he moved to Eindhoven University of Technology. Since 2012, he leads the research group Molecular Plasmonics at the department of Applied Physics. His research focuses on single-molecule detection using plasmonic nanostructures combined with fluorescent approaches. He combines concepts from super-resolution microscopy, single-particle spectroscopy, and biochemistry, to detect and study DNA and proteins using plasmonic particle-based sensors. He combines single-molecule experiments and numerical modelling to study the fundamentals of plasmon-molecule interactions, whereas applications in e.g. healthcare are explored together with the startup company Helia Biomonitoring.

Speech Title: Coming soon