PLENARY SPEAKERS

NANOP 2020 conference will gather high-profile Nanophotonics and Micro/Nano Optics experts to deliver plenary speeches:

Prof. Dimitri Basov

Prof. Dimitri Basov

Columbia University, United States

Dmitri N. Basov (PhD 1991) is a Higgins professor in the Department of Physics at Columbia University [http://infrared.cni.columbia.edu], the Director of the DOE Energy Frontiers Research Center on Programmable Quantum Materials and co-director Max Planck Center in New York City on Non-equilibrium Quantum Phenomena. He has served as a professor (1997-2016) and Chair (2010-2015) of Physics, University of California San Diego. Research interests include: physics of quantum materials, superconductivity, two-dimensional materials, infrared nano-optics. Prizes and awards: Sloan Fellowship (1999), Genzel Prize (2014), Humboldt research award (2009), Frank Isakson Prize, American Physical Society (2012), Moore Investigator (2014), K.J. Button Prize (2019), Vannevar Bush Faculty Fellowship (Department of Defense ,2019).  

Speech Title: Nano-optical phenomena in programmable quantum materials

 

Prof. Alexandre Bouhelier

Prof. Alexandre Bouhelier

Burgundy University, France

Dr. Alexandre Bouhelier. PhD Physics (2001-Uni. Basel, CH). His research started with the development of scanning near-field optical microscopy. He spent four years in the US (Institute of Optics, University of Rochester & Argonne National Laboratory) as a postdoc before integrating the CNRS where he is now a research director conducting his research at the Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté. His current research is focused at developing atomic-scale functional electro-optical components and nonlinear plasmonic devices. He is currently the head of the technological platform ARCEN-Carnot hosted by the University. 

Speech Title: The glowing fate of hot electrons

 

Prof. Sergey I. Bozhevolnyi

Prof. Sergey I. Bozhevolnyi

University of Southern Denmark, Denmark

 

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Prof. Harald Giessen

Prof. Harald Giessen

Stuttgart University, Germany

Harald Giessen (*1966) graduated from Kaiserslautern University with a diploma in Physics and obtained his M.S. and Ph.D. in Optical Sciences from the University of Arizona in 1995 as J.W. Fulbright scholar. After a postdoc at the Max-Planck-Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart he moved to Marburg as assistant professor. From 2001-2004, he was associate professor at the University of Bonn. Since 2005, he is full professor and holds the Chair for Ultrafast Nanooptics in the Department of Physics at the University of Stuttgart. He is also co-chair of the Stuttgart Center of Photonics Engineering, SCoPE. He was guest researcher at the University of Cambridge, and guest professor at the University of Innsbruck and the University of Sydney, at A*Star, Singapore, as well as at Beijing University of Technology. He is associated researcher at the Center for Disruptive Photonic Technologies at Nanyang Technical University, Singapore. He received an ERC Advanced Grant in 2012 for his work on complex nanoplasmonics. He was co-chair (2014) and chair (2016) of the Gordon Conference on Plasmonics and Nanophotonics. He was general chair of the conference Photonics Europe (Strasbourg 2018) and is co-chair of the biannual conference NanoMeta in Seefeld, Austria. He is on the advisory board of the journals “Advanced Optical Materials”, “Nanophotonics: The Journal”, “ACS Photonics”, “ACS Sensors”, and “Advanced Photonics”. He is a topical editor for ultrafast nanooptics, plasmonics, and ultrafast lasers and pulse generation of the journal “Light: Science & Applications” of Nature Publishing Group. He is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America. In 2018 and 2019, he was named „Highly Cited Researcher“ (top 1%) by the Institute of Scientific Information. His research interests include Ultrafast Nano-Optics, Plasmonics, Metamaterials, 3D Printed Micro- and Nano-Optics, Novel mid-IR Ultrafast Laser Sources, Applications in Microscopy, Biology, and Sensing.

Speech Title: Topological plasmonics: Watching the ultrafast vector dynamics of plasmonic skyrmions

 

Prof. Reuven Gordon

Prof. Reuven Gordon

University of Victoria, Canada

Reuven Gordon is a Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Victoria. He has received a Canadian Advanced Technology Alliance Award (2001), an Accelerate BC Industry Impact Award (2007), an AGAUR Visiting Professor Fellowship (2009), the Canada Research Chair position in Nanoplasmonics (2009-2019), the Craigdarroch Silver Medal for Research Excellence (top junior faculty research prize at UVic) (2011), a Fulbright Fellowship (2016) and the Faculty of Engineering Teaching Award (2017). He is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America (OSA), the Society for Photographic Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE), and the Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE). Dr. Gordon has authored and co-authored over 160 journal papers (including 13 invited contributions). He is co-inventor for five patents and two patent applications. Dr. Gordon is a Professional Engineer of BC. Dr. Gordon has been recognized as an “Outstanding Referee” by the American Physical Society.

Speech Title: Quantum Nanoplasmonics: Ultrafast Tunneling Emission and Trapping Single Erbium Emitters

 

Prof. Rachel Grange

Prof. Rachel Grange

ETH Zurich, Switzerland

 

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Prof. Laura Na Liu

Prof. Laura Na Liu

Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Germany

 

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Prof. Lukas Novotny

Prof. Lukas Novotny

ETH Zurich, Switzerland

Lukas Novotny is a Professor of Photonics at ETH ZŸrich.  His research is focused on understanding and controlling light-matter interactions on the nanometer scale.  Novotny did his PhD at ETH ZŸurich and from 1996-99 he was a postdoctoral fellow at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, working on new schemes of single molecule detection and nonlinear spectroscopy. In 1999 he joined the faculty of the Institute of Optics where he started one of the first research programs with focus on nano-optics. Novotny is the author of the textbook ‘Principles of Nano-Optics’, which is currently in its second edition.  He is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. 

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Prof. Mikael C. Rechtsman

Prof. Mikael C. Rechtsman

Pennsylvania State University, United States

Mikael C. Rechtsman is the Downsbrough Early Career Professor of Physics at the Pennsylvania State University, specializing in nonlinear and quantum optics and photonics. He is perhaps best known for the first observation of the topological protection of light, which launched the field of topological photonics.  In recent years, his group was the first to demonstrate optical Weyl points, Weyl exceptional rings, higher-order topological insulators, and the four-dimensional quantum Hall effect for light.  He is the recipient of the ICO Prize, the Kaufman, Packard and Sloan Fellowships, as well as the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Prize.  

Speech Title: Aspects of Topological Photonics

 

Prof. Alejandro W. Rodriguez

Prof. Alejandro W. Rodriguez

Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials, United States

 

Speech Title: Coming soon

 

Prof. Yonatan Sivan

Prof. Yonatan Sivan

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel

 I received a PhD in Physics from Tel Aviv University; then, I was a Fulbright post-doctoral fellow at Purdue University (with V. Shalaev & N. Litchinitser (SUNY)), and a Newton International Fellow at Imperial College London (with Sir J. Pendry). After a short post-doctoral position at the University of Twente (with A. Mosk), I took up a faculty position at Ben-Gurion University, Israel. My group performs theoretical research on various problems in (nonlinear) nanophotonics, including the development of efficient computational methods for Maxwell’s equations, manipulations of ultrafast and ultraslow light pulses, super-resolution STED microscopy with metal nanoparticles, Transformation Optics for nonlinear media, ultrafast heat diffusion in metals, the thermos-optic nonlinear response of metals. Most recently, we provided a quantitative theory for thermal and non-thermal effects in metals, and used it to re-interpret some of the famous experimental results on plasmon-assisted photocatalysis as being of a purely thermal origin.

Speech Title: Light-Matter interactions in metal nanostructures – thermal vs. non-thermal effects