PLENARY SPEAKERS

NANOP 2019 conference will gather high-profile Nanophotonics and Micro/Nano Optics experts to deliver plenary speeches:

Prof. Andrea Alu

Prof. Andrea Alu

The University of Texas at Austin, USA

Andrea Alù is the Einstein Professor of Physics and the Founding Director of the Photonics Initiative at the Advanced Science Research Center, City University of New York. He received his Laurea (2001) and PhD (2007) from the University of Roma Tre, Italy, and, after a postdoc at the University of Pennsylvania, he joined the faculty of the University of Texas at Austin in 2009, where he was the Temple Foundation Endowed Professor until 2018. Dr. Alù’s research interests focus on nano-optics, electromagnetics and acoustics, with an interest in metamaterials and plasmonics. He is a Highly Cited Researcher, and a Fellow of IEEE, OSA, SPIE and APS, and has received several scientific awards, including the ICO Prize in Optics (2016), the NSF Alan T. Waterman award (2015), the OSA Adolph Lomb Medal (2013), and the URSI Issac Koga Gold Medal (2011)

Speech Title: New Frontiers for Light Control and Manipulation Using Metamaterials

Prof. Altug Hatice

Prof. Altug Hatice

EPFL, Switzerland

Hatice Altug is professor of Bioengineering Institute in Ecole Ploytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland. She is also director of EPFL Photonics Doctoral School. She received her Ph.D. in Applied Physics from Stanford University. Her laboratory is developing next generation biosensor and spectroscopy technologies enabling real-time, label-free and high-throughput analysis of low quantities of samples such as biomolecules, pathogens and live cells for applications in disease diagnostics, point-of-care testing, drug discovery and fundamental biological studies. Her lab expertise includes nanophotonics including plasmonics and dielectric metamaterials, micro/nanofluidic integration and new nanofabrication schemes for high-throughput and low-cost manufacturing. Dr. Altug is the recipient of 2012 Optical Society of America Adolph Lomb Medal, which is presented to a person who has made a noteworthy contribution to optics at an early age. She received U.S. Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), which is highest honor bestowed by the United States government on outstanding scientists and engineers in their early career. She is also the recipient of European Research Council Consolidator Award, U.S. Office of Naval Research (ONR) Young Investigator Award, U.S. National Science Foundation CAREER Award, Massachusetts Life Science Center New Investigator Award, IEEE Photonics Society Young Investigator Award. She received Intel Graduate Student Fellowship, IEEE Photonics Society Graduate Student Fellowship. She is the winner of the Inventors’ Challenge competition of Silicon Valley in 2005, best paper and research excellence award by IEEE Photonics Society in 2005. She has been named to Popular Science Magazine’s “Brilliant 10” list in 2011. 

Speech Title: Nanophotonic metasurfaces for biosensing and imaging

Prof. Naomi Halas

Prof. Naomi Halas

Rice University, USA

Naomi J. Halas is the Stanley C. Moore Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Rice University, where she also holds faculty appointments in the Departments of Physics and Astronomy, Chemistry, Materials Science and Nanoengineering, and Bioengineering.  She is best known as the first person to demonstrate that controlling the geometry of metallic nanoparticles determines their color. She pursues studies of plasmonic and nanophotonic systems and their applications. She is author of more than 300 refereed publications, has more than 20 issued patents, and has presented more than 500 invited talks. She has more than 60,000 citations on Web of Science with an h-index of 122.  She has been awarded the APS Frank Isakson Prize and Julius Lilienfeld Prize, the R. W. Wood Prize of the OSA, the ACS Award in Colloid Chemistry, and the Spiers Medal of the Royal Society of Chemistry. Halas has been elected to the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering (U. S.), and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Speech Title: Nanoparticle-light interactions for sustainability and societal impact

Prof. Frank Koppens

Prof. Frank Koppens

ICFO, Spain

Prof. Frank Koppens obtained his PhD in experimental physics at Delft University, at the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, The Netherlands. After a postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard University, Since August 2010, Koppens is group leader at the Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO). The quantum nano-optoelectronics group of Prof. Koppens focuses on both science and technology of novel two-dimensional materials and quantum materials.

Prof. Koppens is vice-chairman of the executive board of the graphene flagship program, a 1000 MillionEuro project for 10 years. He is also the leader of the optoelectronics workpackage within the flagship. Prof. Koppens holds a GSMA Chair with activities related to the Mobile World Congress.

Koppens has received five ERC awards: the ERC starting grant, the ERC consolidator grant, and three ERC proof-of-concept grants. Other awards include the Christiaan Hugyensprijs 2012, the national award for research in Spain, and the IUPAP young scientist prize in optics. In total, Koppens has published more than 70 refereed papers (H-index above 49), with more than 35 in Science and Nature family journals. Total citations >17.500 (google scholar).

Speech Title: Topological nanophotonics with 2D-material heterostructures

Prof. Peter Nordlander

Prof. Peter Nordlander

Rice University, USA

Prof. Peter Nordlander (http://nordlander.rice.edu, ResearcherID: A-2560-2008; ORCID: 0000-0002-1633-2937) obtained his PhD degree in Theoretical Physics at Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg in Sweden in1985. After postdoctoral positions at IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center at Yorktown Heights (USA) and AT&T Bell Laboratories at Murray Hill (USA) and at Rutgers University, he joined the faculty at Rice University in 1989 and is currently Wiess Chair of Natural Sciences and Professor of Physics and Astronomy, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Professor of Materials Science and Nanoengineering. He has been a Visiting Professor at University of Paris, at the Institute of Physics at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, a C.N. Yang Professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, and at Peking University. He is currently a Prominent Overseas Visiting Professor in the Department of Physics at Wuhan University. His research background is in theoretical condensed matter and nanophysics. His current research is focused on the theoretical and computational modeling of Plasmonics and Nanophotonics phenomena. He is an associate editor of ACS Nano. He is a fellow of APS, AAAS, SPIE, OSA, and MRS and is the recipient of the 1999 Charles Duncan Award for Outstanding Academic Achievement (Rice), the 2013 Willis E. Lamb Award for Laser Science and Quantum Optics, the 2014 Frank Isakson Prize for Optical Effects in Solids, the 2015 R. W. Wood Prize for Optics, and the 2019 Hershel M. Rich Invention Award (Rice).  He has published more than 350 refereed articles, given more than 400 invited presentations at international conferences and workshops, has been cited more than 45,000 times with a Web of Science h-index above 100, and has been a Thomson-Reuters Highly Cited Researcher in Physics and Chemistry since 2013.

Speech Title: Plasmon-induced hot carrier generation and applications in light harvesting

Prof. Albert Polman

Prof. Albert Polman

AMOLF Institute, Netherlands

Albert Polman is program leader at the Center for Nanophotonics in the NWO Institute AMOLF in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and Professor of Photonic Materials for Photovoltaics at the University of Amsterdam. Polman’s research group focuses on nanophotovoltaics, the study of light management at the nanoscale to realize solar cells with ultra-high efficiency that can be made at low costs, and develops cathodoluminescence spectroscopy as a super-resolution imaging technique for nanophotonics. He has published over 300 papers that have been cited 30.000 times.

Polman is member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences and recipient of ERC Advanced Investigator Grants (2011, 2016), the EPS Research into the Science of Light Prize (2017), the Physica Prize of the Dutch Physical Society (2014), the Julius Springer Award for Applied Physics (2014), the ENI Renewable Energy Award (2012), and the MRS Materials Innovation and Characterization Award (2012). Polman is co-founder of Delmic BV that brings an instrument for cathodoluminescence spectroscopy on the market that was developed in his group.

Speech Title: Nanoscale (in)coherent optical excitations in the electron microscope

Prof. Din Ping Tsai

Prof. Din Ping Tsai

National Taiwan University, Taiwan

Din Ping Tsai received Ph.D from University of Cincinnati, USA in 1990. He is a Fellow of AAAS, APS, IEEE, OSA, SPIE, JSAP, Electro Magnetics Academy (EMA), Physical Society of Taiwan; respectively. He is also Academician of Asia Pacific Academy of Materials (APAM), and Member of International Academy of Engineering (IAE). He currently serves as Editor of Progress in Quantum Electronics, Associate Editor of Journal of Lightwave Technology, Member of Editorial boards of APL photonics, ACS photonics, Physical Review Applied, Optics Communications, Plasmonics, Optoelectronics Letters, Opto-Electronic Advances, Small Methods, Advanced Quantum Technologies, respectively. He is now the President of Taiwan Information Storage Association (TISA). He was the Director of the Board of SPIE; Member of OSA Fellow Honorary Committee; SPIE Fellow Committee; Member of IEEE I&M Fellow Committee; IEEE Joseph F. Keithley Award Committee; OSA and IS&T Edwin H. Land Medal Committee; President of Taiwan Photonics Society (TPS); Chairman of IEEE Instrument and Measurement Society Taipei Chapter; and Chairman of the SPIE Taiwan chapter; respectively.

Speech Title: Meta-optics: Meta-lens for imaging and sensing

 Prof. Jörg Wrachtrup

Prof. Jörg Wrachtrup

University of Stuttgart, Germany

Joerg Wrachtrup, Professor and director of the 3rd Institute of Physics and the Center for Applied Quantum Science, University of Stuttgart (2000, continuing) as well as Max Planck fellow at the MPI for Solid State Research Stuttgart, has pioneered the field of single spin physics by initially doing the very first single electron and subsequently the first single nuclear spins experiments. By combining optics and spin resonance he discovered defects in insulators, most notably defects in diamond, as a valuable system for quantum information processing in novel type of quantum sensor for electric and magnetic fields. He and his group pioneered application of these novel sensor techniques. His current research interest is geared towards application of quantum enhanced sensing in bio, medical as well as material sciences.

Professor Wrachtrup published close to 300 papers in refereed journals with numerous Nature and Science papers, plus reviews in both over the past years. In 2011 and 2017, he was awarded two Advanced Research Grant of the European Research Council, in 2012 he received the Leibniz Price of the German Science Foundation, in 2013 the Bruker Prize and in 2014 the Max Planck Research Award. He is member of the Berlin Brandenburg Academy of Science and has continuously been listed as “Highly Cited Researcher” since 2014.

Speech Title: Quantum networks and sensing with color centers

Prof. Anatoly Zayats

Prof. Anatoly Zayats

King’s College London, UK

Professor Anatoly V. Zayats is a Chair in Experimental Physics and the head of the Photonics and Nanotechnology at the Department of Physics, King’s College London, where he also leads Nano-optics and Near-field Spectroscopy Laboratory (www.nano-optics.org.uk). He is a Co-Director of the London Centre for Nanotechnology and the London Institute of Advanced Light Technologies. His current research interests are in the areas of nanophotonics, plasmonics, metamaterials, scanning probe microscopy, nonlinear and ultrafast optics and spectroscopy, and optical properties of surfaces, thin films, semiconductors and low-dimensional structures.

Speech Title: Nonlinear optics enabled by metamaterials

Prof. Stefan Maier

Prof. Stefan Maier

Imperial College London, UK

Stefan Maier is the Chair in Hybrid Nanosystems at LMU Munich and the Lee-Lucas Chair in Experimental Physics at Imperial College London. A graduate from Caltech, his research in nanoplasmonics received numerous awards, including the Sackler Prize in the Physical Sciences and the Paterson Medal of the Institute of Physics.

Speech Title: Plasmonic nanoparticles as energy converters for chemical reactions and for the launching of acoustic surface waves

INVITED SPEAKERS

NANOP 2019 conference will gather high-profile Nanophotonics and Micro/Nano Optics experts to deliver plenary speeches:

Prof. Peter Baum

Prof. Peter Baum

University of Konstanz, Germany

Peter Baum is a physics professor at the University of Konstanz. He received his PhD in 2005 from LMU München and subsequently worked as a postdoctoral scholar with Prof. Ahmed Zewail at Caltech on ultrafast electron diffraction from complex materials. Later, he became head of the ultrafast electron imaging research group at Prof. Ferenc Krausz’ laboratory for attosecond and high- field science at the Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics in Garching. At his current position in Konstanz, his research focus is the interaction of light and matter at ultimately small temporal and spatial dimensions. His key technologies are attosecond and femtosecond electron microscopy and diffraction. In his spare time, he listens to metal music and goes skiing, swimming or surfing.

Speech Title: Seeing atoms and electrons in space and time

Prof. Nathalie Destouches

Prof. Nathalie Destouches

University of Lyon, University of Saint-Etienne

Coming soon

Speech Title: Plasmonic colors for three-fold image multiplexing

 

Dr. Kerstin Göpfrich

Dr. Kerstin Göpfrich

Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Germany

Dr. Kerstin Göpfrich studied Physics and Molecular Medicine at the University of Erlangen. She obtained her Master’s and PhD degree in Biophysics from the University of Cambridge, where she held a Gates Fellowship to work with Prof. Ulrich Keyser. She designed artificial ion channels from DNA origami and studied their functionality in lipid membranes, renowned with the Abdus Salam Prize. After her PhD graduation in 2017, she joined the MaxSynBio consortium and the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg, focussing on the bottom-up assembly of synthetic cells. As a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow hosted by Prof. Joachim Spatz, her current research combines microfluidics and DNA nanotechnology to engineer fully synthetic cells from synthetic parts.

Speech Title: Bottom-up assembly and dynamic actuation of synthetic cells

Prof. Richard Haglund

Prof. Richard Haglund

Vanderbilt University

Richard Haglund was educated at Wesleyan University and received the Ph.D. in experimental nuclear physics at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill.  After nine years as a staff member at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, he joined the faculty of Vanderbilt University, where he holds a Stevenson Chair in Physics.  Current research in the Haglund group includes photon interactions with correlated oxides, ultrafast silicon photonics, phononics in two-dimensional materials and single-photon emitters for quantum information applications.   He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, and has received a Humboldt Research Fellowship and the Humboldt Senior Scientist Prize for research in materials physics.

Speech Title: Refractive index-based control of hyperbolic polariton propagation

Prof. Tim Liedl

Prof. Tim Liedl

LMU, Germany

Tim Liedl is Professor for experimental physics at the Ludwig-Maximilians Universität since 2009.
He received his diploma in physics in 2004 in the group of Wolfgang J. Parak at Ludwig-Maximlians-University Munich (LMU) where he worked on the development of hydrophilic coatings for fluorescent semiconductor nanoparticles. In 2007 he obtained his Ph.D. in the group of Friedrich C. Simmel studying DNA-based nanodevices and switches which are driven by chemical oscillations. From spring 2007 till summer 2009 he visited William M. Shih’s laboratory at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute / Harvard Medical School where he used the DNA-origami method to construct self-assembling two- and three-dimensional structures.
The research of Tim Liedl is multi-disciplinary and exploratory positioned at the interface between nanoscience, synthetic biology and cell-biology. Its current focus lies on the application of DNA-based nanostructures in biology and on self-assembled plasmonic materials.

Speech Title: Tools and materials assembled from DNA

Prof. Annemarie Pucci

Prof. Annemarie Pucci

Heidelberg University, Germany

Annemarie Pucci (Lehmann) studied physics in Jena, Germany. Her doctorate studies at the university of Rostock were dedicated to the theory of optical phonons of disordered materials. Already as postdoc she started with infrared analytics of thin layers, which she later on continued at the university in Jena and, as guest researcher, in Troitzk/Moscow (ISAS), Tübingen (university), and Stuttgart (MPI-FKF). Before becoming a university professor for experimental physics in Heidelberg in 1995, she started doing surface science and He-atom scattering experiments at the physics department of the FU Berlin. Her research in Heidelberg is concentrated on studies of infrared excitations of surfaces, nanostructures, and thin layers from various inorganic and organic materials with focus on the couplings of different excitation types. She was the first who explained surface enhanced infrared absorption as a Fano-type effect related to plasmonic excitations. At the university of Heidelberg, Annemarie Pucci gives lectures on condensed matter physics, optical properties of condensed matter, and surface science. Her research projects included surface science, infrared plasmonics, bio-photonics, laboratory astronomy, organic electronics, and low-dimensional electron systems.

Speech Title: Plasmonic enhancement for dust nanoparticle sensing

Prof. Frank Vollmer

Prof. Frank Vollmer

University of Lyon, University of Saint-Etienne

Frank Vollmer obtained his PhD in ‘Physics & Biology’ from the Rockefeller University NYC, USA, in 2004. He then became leader of an independent research group at the Rowland Institute at Harvard University where he was appointed Rowland Fellow from 2004 to 2009. From 2010 to 2011 he joined the Wyss Institute for Bio-Inspired Engineering at Harvard University as a Scholar-in-Residence. In 2011 he was appointed group leader (untenured associate professor) at the newly established Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light in Erlangen, Germany. Since 2011 he was also appointed as Instructor in Medicine and Associate Bioengineer at Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School in Boston, USA, where he directed a satellite laboratory until 2016. Since 2016 he is Professor in Biophysics at the School of Physics, University of Exeter, UK. His laboratory is part of the newly established Living Systems Institute.

Speech Title: Single-Molecule Plasmonic Nano-Sensing of Enzyme Dynamics and Aminoacids

Dr. Shumin Xiao

Dr. Shumin Xiao

Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhe

 Shumin Xiao received her Ph.D. degree from the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in Purdue University in 2010. After one year’s postdoctoral work in Purdue, she joined Harbin Institute of Technology as Professor in 2011. Her research interests are mainly focused on integrated optoelectronics, semiconductor devices, metamaterials, plasmonic physics and devices, nonlinear optics, and nanophotonics. She has authored or co-authored more than 150 peer-reviewed journal papers.

Speech Title: TiO2 metasurfaces: From visible planar photonics to photo-chemistry