INVITED SPEAKERS

Prof. Raffaella Buonsanti

Prof. Raffaella Buonsanti

Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, Switzerland

Raffaella Buonsanti obtained her PhD in Nanochemistry in 2010 at the National Nanotechnology Laboratory, University of Salento. Then, she moved to the US where she spent over five years at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, first as a postdoc and project scientist at the Molecular Foundry and after as a tenure-track staff scientist in the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis. In October 2015 she started as a tenure-track Assistant Professor in the Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering at EPFL. She is passionate about materials chemistry, nanocrystals, understanding nucleation and growth mechanisms, energy, chemical transformations. She also loves nature and animals.

Talk title: Colloidal chemistry for controlled and tunable catalysis

Dr. Gabriel Sánchez-Santolino

Dr. Gabriel Sánchez-Santolino

Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden

Gabriel Sánchez Santolino obtained his Ph.D. in Physics at the Complutense University of Madrid in 2015. He then joined the University of Tokyo as a postdoctoral researcher from 2015 to 2017. In 2017, he obtained a Juan de la Cierva postdoctoral fellowship and joined the Spanish National Research Council at the Institute of Materials Science of Madrid. Since 2019 he has been a researcher at Chalmers University of Technology. His scientific interests are the development of advanced scanning transmission electron microscopy techniques and their application to materials physics.

Talk title: Direct Electric Field Imaging by Differential Phase-Contrast in the Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

Prof. Simone Schuerle

Prof. Simone Schuerle

ETH Zürich, Switzerland

Simone Schuerle is Assistant Professor (Tenure Track) for Responsive Biomedical Systems at Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETHZ), Switzerland. Prior she was researching at the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT as a postdoctoral fellow on nanosensors for in vivo tumor profiling as well methods to enhance drug transport into tumor tissues (2014-2017). She graduated in 2009 from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Industrial Engineering and Management (Dipl. Wi.-Ing.) with specialization in microsystems and nanotechnology. During her studies, she was also researching at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand, about automated drug infusion and control and at the University of Kyoto, Japan, in the field of carbon nanotube-based nanosensors. She then joined the Institute of Robotics and Intelligent Systems at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETHZ) where she focused on magnetic manipulation techniques for biomedical applications. She was awarded with the ETH medal for her doctoral thesis and with fellowships from the SNSF, DAAD and the Society in Science for her postdoctoral studies. She was honored with the election as “Young Scientist” by the World Economic Forum for her contributions integrating her scientific knowledge into society for the public good and has served to the Global Future Council on the Human Enhancement. She is also co-founder of MagnebotiX, a young spin-off from ETHZ.

Talk title: Engineering responsive nanoscale systems for precision medicine.

Prof. Sara Skrabalak

Prof. Sara Skrabalak

Indiana University Bloomington, USA

Dr. Sara Skrabalak received her B.A. degree in chemistry from Washington University in St. Louis in 2002, where she conducted research with Professor William E. Buhro. She was the recipient of the Sowden Award in undergraduate research from the Department of Chemistry. She then moved to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where she completed her Ph.D. degree in chemistry in fall of 2006 under the tutelage of Professor Kenneth S. Suslick. There, she was the recipient of the T.S. Piper Thesis Award for her work on porous materials. She then conducted postdoctoral research at the University of Washington – Seattle with Professors Younan Xia and Xingde Li, designing nanomaterials for biomedical applications. She began her independent career in the Chemistry Department at Indiana University – Bloomington in 2008, where she was named the James H. Rudy Professor in 2015. She is a recipient of both NSF CAREER and DOE Early Career Awards. She is a 2012 Research Corporation Cottrell Scholar, a 2013 Sloan Research Fellow, a 2014 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar, and recipient of the 2014 ACS Award in Pure Chemistry and 2015 Baekeland Award. In 2017, she was named both a Fulbright Fellow and Guggenheim Fellow as well as the recipient of Research Corporation’s Frontiers in Research Excellence & Discovery Award. Her research group focuses on nanomaterial design and synthesis for applications in catalysis, solar energy use, secured electronics, chemical sensing, and more (http://www.indiana.edu/~skrablab/).

Talk title: Symmetry Making and Breaking in Seeded Growth of Metal Nanocrystals.

Dr. Nadine Nassif

Dr. Nadine Nassif

Sorbonne Université, France

Nadine Nassif (1975) is a CNRS researcher at the Laboratory “Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Paris” (UMR 7574). She gained her Ph.D. on bacteria encapsulation in silica sol-gel matrices under Jacques Livage’s guidance (2001-2003) at UMR 7574. Afterward, she did post-doctoral work with Markus Antonietti and Helmut Coelfen (Max  Planck Institute for Colloids & Interfaces, Potsdam) on biomimetic approaches for calcium carbonate crystallization (2003-2005). Then she worked in Marie-Madeleine Giraud-Guille’s team (UMR 7574) as assistant professor “ATER” (2005-2006).

Since 2007, her research focuses on collagen self-assembly to biomimetics materials for tissue engineering and biomineralization studies. She completed her professional qualification (Habilitation) in 2016 on “Physico-chemical approaches of bone biomineralization”.Her main present interest is building a tissue library based on Type I collagen self-assembly by controlling the three-dimensional shaping of the resulting materials and determines the “structural-function” properties. For this purpose, she is sharing her time with the ESPCI.

Talk title: Building a tissue library based on Type I collagen self-assembly.

Dr. Neus Bastus

Dr. Neus Bastus

Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Spain

Neus G. Bastús is Ramon y Cajal staff scientist at the Institut Català de Nanotecnologia (ICN2), Barcelona, Spain. She obtained her Ph.D. in Physics at the Universitat de Barcelona working on the synthesis and functionalization of metal nanoparticles for biomedical applications. In January 2009, she joined the physical-chemistry department at the University of Hamburg as a Beatriu de Pinos Postdoctoral fellow in the group of Prof. Weller. During that time, she expanded her expertise on material design, shifting the focus of her research towards the synthesis and functionalization of complex nanocrystals with applicability in energy harvesting and catalysis. In 2011, she obtained a Juan de la Cierva postdoctoral fellowship and joined the Inorganic Nanoparticles Group at the ICN2. In 2013 she was awarded a Ramón y Cajal Fellowship, ranked first in the area of Materials Science and she began her senior career on the colloidal synthesis of advanced functional inorganic nanocrystals with precisely tunable properties and advanced applicability in energy harvesting and catalysis.

Talk title: Colloidal Synthesis of Complex Multicomponent Inorganic Nanocrystals.

Prof. Maria Francesca Casula

Prof. Maria Francesca Casula

University of Cagliari, Italy

Maria Francesca Casula is Associate Professor of General and Inorganic Chemistry at the University of Cagliari; from 2004-2014 she has held the position of Assistant Professor at the same University. She is a member of the Italian Consortium of Materials Science and Technology. Her research is within the Functional Materials Group and is devoted to the synthesis and morpho-structural characterization of materials for application in biomedicine, catalysis, environment, and photonics and is carried out in collaboration with national and international research groups. The results are reported in over 100 publications on peer-reviewed international journals. Teaching activities include “General and Inorganic Chemistry” course for students in Pharmacy and in Toxicology and “Bioinorganic Chemistry” Masters students in Biology. Her background includes the Degree in Chemistry (summa cum laude) at the University of Cagliari, the Ph.D. in Chemistry on the “Synthesis and Characterization of Nanostructured Solids” under the supervision of Prof. Anna Corrias at the University of Cagliari. She was awarded a scholarship offered by INSTM-ENEA; of a post-doc on “Synthesis and Characterization of Nanocomposites”; of a CNR mobility grant at the Center for Nanoscience at LMU, Munich; and she has been visiting researcher at the University of California at Berkeley, U.S.A. under the supervision of Prof. A.P. Alivisatos.

Dr. Eva Hemmer

Dr. Eva Hemmer

University of Ottawa, Canada

Eva Hemmer received her PhD in materials science from Saarland University (Germany, 2008), where she focused on the synthesis of lanthanide alkoxides and their decomposition to lanthanide-containing inorganic nanomaterials. This experience was further deepened during her postdoctoral studies, working on lanthanide-based near-infrared bioimaging at the Tokyo University of Science (2009-2012). In 2013 she was awarded a Feodor Lynen Research Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation to join the groups of Profs. Fiorenzo Vetrone and Francois Légaré at INRS-EMT (Université du Québec, Canada, 2012-2015) to develop nanothermometers based on upconverting nanoparticles. In winter 2016, Eva Hemmer joined the Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences at the University of Ottawa in order to design and study novel multifunctional lanthanide-based nanocarriers for biomedical and energy conversion applications.