PLENARY SPEAKERS

S3IC 2019 conference will gather high-profile Sensors, Single-Molecules and Nanosystems experts to deliver plenary speeches:

Prof. Michel Orrit

Prof. Michel Orrit

Leiden University, Netherlands

Michel Orrit was born on February 27, 1956 in Toulouse, France, and studied at Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris. He obtained a Ph.D. physics in 1984 at Bordeaux University. During a post-doctoral stay in Göttingen (Germany) with H. Kuhn and D.Möbius, he studied angmuir-Blodgett films doped with dyes. Back in Bordeaux, he and J. Bernard used the spectral hole-burning technique to investigate low-temperature dynamics and molecular orientation in these systems. They observed the first fluorescence signal from a single molecule in 1990. Their fluorescence excitation method was quickly adopted in several groups throughout the world, and was soon extended to room temperature in 1993. Since then, Orrit's group first in Bordeaux, then in Leiden (Netherlands) since 2001, has stressed the power of single-molecule spectroscopy to remove ensemble averaging and to reveal dynamics at molecular scales without need for synchronization. He continues developing and applying single-molecule techniques to soft matter, nanoparticle plasmonics and nonlinear optics. Michel Orrit recently received the Edison-Volta Prize of the European Physical Society in 2016, and the Spinoza Prize of the Dutch Science Foundation NWO in 2017.

Speech title: Coming soon

Prof. Jeremy J. Baumberg

Prof. Jeremy J. Baumberg

University of Cambridge, UK

Prof. Jeremy J. Baumberg FRS, directs a UK Nano-Photonics Centre at the University of Cambridge and has extensive experience in developing optical materials structured on the nano-scale that can be assembled in large volume. He is also Director of the Cambridge Nano Doctoral Training Centre, a key UK site for training PhD students in interdisciplinary Nano research. Strong experience with Hitachi, IBM, his own spin-offs Mesophotonics and Base4, as well as strong industrial engagement give him a unique position to combine academic insight with industry application in a two-way flow.  With over 20000 citations, he is a leading innovator in Nano. This has led to awards of the IoP Faraday gold Medal (2017), Royal Society Rumford Medal (2014), IoP Young Medal (2013), Royal Society Mullard Prize (2005), the IoP Charles Vernon Boys Medal (2000) and the IoP Mott Lectureship (2005). He frequently talks on NanoScience to the media, and is a strategic advisor on NanoTechnology to the UK Research Councils. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society, the Optical Society of America, and the Institute of Physics. His recent popular science book “The Secret Life of Science: How Science Really Works and Why it Matters” is just published by PUP, see np.phy.cam.ac.uk

Speech title: Coming soon

Prof. Warwick Bowen

Prof. Warwick Bowen

University Of Queensland, Australia

Prof Bowen’s research focuses on the implications of quantum science on precision measurement, and applications of quantum measurement in areas ranging from quantum condensed matter physics, to the biosciences. He is an Australian Future Fellow, Director of the University of Queensland Precision Sensing Initiative, and a Program Manager in the Australian Centre for Engineered Quantum Systems. His laboratory was the first to explore the use of quantum engineering of light in biological microscopy. This allowed the demonstration of quantum enhancement of biological measurements and of single molecule sensing with ultralow optical intensities, among other results. Prof Bowen’s laboratory also has active research efforts on integrated photonics, quantum control of macroscopic mechanical devices, and superfluid helium physics. His research is supported by the Australian Research Council, the US Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Lockheed Martin, the US Army Research Office and the Australian Defence Science and Technology Group.

Speech title: Coming soon

Prof. Philipp Kukura

Prof. Philipp Kukura

University of Oxford, UK

Philipp Kukura read Chemistry at St Hugh’s College Oxford until 2002 and did a PhD at the University of California, Berkeley with Rich Mathies in ultrafast spectroscopy before moving to ETH Zurich to work with Vahid Sandoghdar in nano-optics. After returning to Oxford initially as an EPSRC Career Acceleration Fellow in 2010, he was elected to a tutorial fellowship at Exeter College in 2011 and promoted to Full Professor in 2016. Recent awards include those by the Royal Society of Chemistry (Harrison-Meldola 2011 and Marlow 2015), the European Biophysical Society Association (Young Investigator Medal 2017), a Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award (2018) and selection as a UK Blavatnik Award Finalist (2018). PK leads an interdisciplinary research group that focusses on the development and application of new optical methodologies to study biomolecular structure, dynamics and interactions, their role in controlling protein function and resulting avenues for therapeutic intervention.

Speech title: Weighing single molecules with light

Prof. Stefan Maier

Prof. Stefan Maier

LMU Munich, Germany

Stefan Maier is the Chair in Hybrid Nanosystems at LMU Munich and the Lee-Lucas Chair in Experimental Physics at Imperial College London. A graduate from Caltech, his research in nanoplasmonics received numerous awards, including the Sackler Prize in the Physical Sciences and the Paterson Medal of the Institute of Physics.

Speech title: Coming soon 

Prof. Tim Liedl

Prof. Tim Liedl

LMU Munich, Germany

Tim Liedl is Professor for experimental physics at the Ludwig-Maximilians Universität since 2009.
He received his diploma in physics in 2004 in the group of Wolfgang J. Parak at Ludwig-Maximlians-University Munich (LMU) where he worked on the development of hydrophilic coatings for fluorescent semiconductor nanoparticles. In 2007 he obtained his Ph.D. in the group of Friedrich C. Simmel studying DNA-based nanodevices and switches which are driven by chemical oscillations. From spring 2007 till summer 2009 he visited William M. Shih’s laboratory at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute / Harvard Medical School where he used the DNA-origami method to construct self-assembling two- and three-dimensional structures.
The research of Tim Liedl is multi-disciplinary and exploratory positioned at the interface between nanoscience, synthetic biology and cell-biology. Its current focus lies on the application of DNA-based nanostructures in biology and on self-assembled plasmonic materials.

Speech title: Coming soon 

Prof. Cees Dekker

Prof. Cees Dekker

TU Delft, The Netherlands

Prof. dr. Cees Dekker (1959) is Distinguished University Professor at Delft University of Technology, Director of the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience Delft, and KNAW Royal Academy Professor. Trained as a solid-state physicist, he discovered many of the exciting electronic properties of carbon nanotubes in the 1990s. Since 2000 he moved to single-molecule biophysics and nanobiology, with research from studies of DNA loop extrusion and supercoiling to DNA translocation through nanopores. Recently his research has focused on studying cell division with bacteria on chip, while he is also attempting to ultimately build synthetic cells from the bottom up.

Dekker is Director of the prestigious Kavli Institute of Nanoscience Delft. He initiated an entirely new Department of Bionanoscience at Delft and leads the 51M€ NWO Zwaartekracht program NanoFront. Dekker is an elected member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences and fellow to the APS and the IOP. He published over 300 papers, received an honorary doctorate, and many prizes such as the 2001 Agilent Europhysics Prize, the 2003 Spinoza award, the 2012 ISNSCE Nanoscience Prize, and the 2017 NanoSmat Prize. In 2006, Delft University appointed him as an Institute Professor. In 2014, Dekker was knighted as Knight in the Order of the Netherlands Lion, and in 2015, he received his second ERC Advanced Grant and the KNAW appointed him as a Royal Academy Professor.

Speech title: Coming soon 

Prof. Petra Schwille

Prof. Petra Schwille

Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Germany

Petra Schwille is Director at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried near Munich, Germany, and Honorary Professor at the LMU Munich. She studied physics and philosophy in Stuttgart and Göttingen and graduated 1993 with Diploma in Physics at the Georg August University, Göttingen. She obtained her Ph.D. in 1996 from the TU Braunschweig, with a thesis on Fluorescence (Cross-)Correlation Spectroscopy, performed at the MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Göttingen. After a postdoctoral stay at Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, she returned to the MPI Göttingen as a research group leader, financed by the BMBF Biofuture grant, in 1999. In 2002, she accepted a Chair of Biophysics at the newly established BIOTEC center of the TU Dresden. In 2010, she received the Leibniz-Prize.
Since 2012, she is heading the department of Cellular and Molecular Biophysics at the MPI of Biochemistry. Her scientific interests range from single molecule biophysics to the synthetic biology of reconstituted systems.

Speech title: Coming soon 

Prof. Reuven Gordon

Prof. Reuven Gordon

University of Victoria, Canada

Reuven Gordon received his Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Cambridge. In 2002, he joined the University of Victoria, where he currently holds a Canada Research Chair in Nanoplasmonics and a Professor position in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. In 2009, Dr. Gordon was a visiting Professor at the Institute for Photonic Sciences (ICFO, Barcelona, Spain). He has received a Canadian Advanced Technology Alliance Award (2001), an Accelerate BC Industry Impact Award (2007), an AGAUR Visiting Professor Fellowship (2009), and the Craigdarroch Silver Medal for Research Excellence (2011). He was elected Fellow of the Optical Society of America (OSA) in 2016 and Fellow of the Society for Photographic Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) in 2018. Dr. Gordon has authored and co-authored over 150 journal papers (including 12 invited contributions) and he has co-authored 6 book chapters. He is co-inventor for four patents and three patent applications. Dr. Gordon is a Professional Engineer of BC. Dr. Gordon has been recognized as an “Outstanding Referee” by the American Physical Society.

Speech title: Coming soon 

Prof. Christian Degen

Prof. Christian Degen

ETH Zurich, Switzerland

Christian Degen is an experimental physicist with a background in magnetic resonance and scanning probe microscopy. He received a diploma in physics from the ETH Zurich in 2001 and a Ph.D. in nuclear magnetic resonance from the same institution. From 2006 to 2008, he was a post-doctoral researcher in the Nanoscale Studies division of IBM Almaden, advised by Dr. Dan Rugar. In 2009, he became Assistant Professor at MIT, and moved with his group to ETH Zurich in 2011. His laboratory focuses on novel nanoscale sensors based on single spins in diamond and on ultrasensitive nanomechanical resonators.

Speech title: Coming soon 

Prof. Hagan Bayley

University of Oxford, UK

Short Bio: Coming soon

Speech title: Coming soon 

Prof. Niek van Hulst

ICFO, Spain

Short Bio: Coming soon

Speech title: Coming soon